Thursday, 28 August 2014

Look: Death in the University



 Death in the University
by Dr Paul Hoole
(From my Facebook: Paul Hoole)

Death visited the University community late last week. One student was taken away all of a sudden (today was the funeral), without warning. Another student, I was told, is in critical condition at the hospital. How do we come to terms with death? One report says that on average every teenager thinks about death every 5 minutes. How do we see death and what happens after? 

1. Steve Jobs. The renowned CEO of the Apple Company (and PIXAR) the late Steve Jobs in his speech to students at one of the top Universities, Stanford University, said that death helped him to make the important choices of life. Death takes away “all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure”. When he was first diagnosed with cancer at the age of about 49, which eventually led to his early death, he evidently realized that in the end he had nothing to lose in life, death will take away everything. It helped him evidently, to choose what is really important in life, knowing how short it is, to do what he really loves doing. To live every day as if it is his last day (from what I can trace, originally spoken by a Puritan Pastor of 17th century), and to make each day a day worth living (evidently from age 17). Steve Jobs like all of us, was confronted with “our helplessness in the face of death.”

2. Famous Oxford University Professor AJ Ayer, famous for his lifelong Atheism (teaching that there is no God, this life is all there is to live, after that the End), once in life went into what is known as brain death. But he came back alive. He said that in those moments that he was medically (clinically)  dead, he saw things including some bright light after death, and he believed that he saw God, and that he will have to revise all that he had written as an Atheist. But his intellectual, atheistic friends became angry and wrote angry letters to him. So he finally backed away, and weakened his article by saying that he is still an Atheist, but that after that experience he believes that this life may not be the end of the story, there is something beyond this life, something unknown after death.

3. Another famous Reading Philosophy Professor Anthony Flew – who began his teaching career at Oxford and lectured in many other Universities- and Atheist (who wrote books read all over the world), in his honesty that he will go where facts of his research took him. He came to the conclusion that there is a God, there is more to life than what we see, touch and perceive with our senses. He claimed that his research showed that the resurrection of Jesus from the dead, as reported in the Bible had quality and quantity of evidence, as no other miracle-claim. He believed that facts and evidence led him to change his views, and he wrote withdrawing his previous teachings and claims. He had come to believe in the existence of God (There Is A God), and that there is more to life than what an Atheist believes.

4. The picture with the four horses shows the red horse and its rider who represents death in a Bible book (he is one of the four evil riders of the white, red, black and pale horses). The red horse rider death alone is followed by another figure, who gathers in people that the red horse rider cuts down (into a place after death).

5. A graphic portrayal of hope is found in his most popular story book (The Lord of the Rings) by Oxford Professor JRR Tolkien. He speaks of life after death, of heaven as portrayed in the Bible, in the following terms: Gandalf says to Pippin (in the Lord of the Rings, in the heat of battle): 
"The journey doesn't end here. Death is just another path, one that we all must take. The grey rain curtain of this world rolls back and all turns to silver glass. And then you see it. White shores, and beyond, a far green country under a swift sunrise." 

Prof. Hoole, Aug 2014 (prof.hoole@gmail.com)

Wednesday, 6 August 2014

On Looking at Current Pay-scale to decide on Career Path and On IELTS

On Looking at Current Pay-scale to decide on Career Path and On IELTS



The data I produced for the USA is from the National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE). Such an association to coordinate issues, and keep all academic programs on line with national demand.

Paul H

The final Salary Survey report for Class of 2013 graduates will be published in early January 2014.
Figure 1: Average Salaries by Discipline
Category
2013 Average Salary
2012 Average Salary
Percent Change
Business
$55,635
$51,541
7.9%
Communications
$43,835
$42,286
3.7%
Education
$40,337
$39,080
3.2%
Engineering
$62,062
$60,639
2.3%
Humanities & Social Sciences
$37,791
$36,824
2.6%
Math & Sciences
$42,731
$42,355
0.9%
Overall
$45,327
$44,259
2.4%
Source: September 2013 Salary Survey, National Association of Colleges and Employers


For your information given below is NACE’s list of top-paying majors for new college graduates in USA:
Computer Engineering
$70,400
Chemical Engineering
$66,400
Computer Science
$64,400
Aerospace/Aeronautical/Astronautical Engineering
$64,000
Mechanical Engineering
$62,900
Electrical/Electronics and Communications Engineering
$62,300
Civil Engineering
$57,600
Finance
$57,300
Construction Science/Management
$56,600
Information Sciences and Systems
$56,100
(from SRHH)

It may also indicate that it is right that ECE Dept amongst the academics there is discussion about commencing Computer Eng degree soon

___________________________________________________________________________
IELTS Examinations

(I don't remember everything about it but hopefully this helps)
1. Written: These ask for essays on wide topics (etc: global warming...), a written explanation of  a structured diagram with labells (ect: a laboratory set up for water condensation. They label it and give a general idea of whats going on and you are required to write it up in the form of an essay. I think there were also questions on grammar.

2. Reading: Basically comprehension questions where they give a passage and then ask questions.

3. Listening: They play a recording of different passages and conversations. You are given a page with fill in the blanks or questions based on what they play and while they play the recordings you are supposed to jot down the answers.

4. Speaking: A basic conversation with some short questions at first and then later you speak on a topic they give fro about a minute or two (the focus isn't so much on the content of what you say as on the way you say it- grammar, vocabulary, fluency..)

This is where British Council provides free practice tests: http://takeielts.britishcouncil.org/prepare/road-to-ielts

(EJH)

Monday, 28 July 2014

Research Related Teaching and Learning



Research Related Teaching and Learning
Dr. Paul Hoole
It has been well said that the best way to impart the importance of and interest of learning business, mathematical, scientific, political, technical knowledge is to show the emotional, social and immediate aspect or need for the subjects being taught and learned. The best way to impart this to the students is to relate class room and laboratory classes to current research interests and progress. Some outstanding teachers and researchers go to the extent of rooting their entire class room instruction on their research and innovation work.  I have given below my own research related publications with others from June 2013 to May 2014 which I often refer to in my lectures (I remain thankful to Prof. Pumwa for initiating me into Renewable Energy research by sending me off to attend a World Bank meeting on it in the capital; hence over the past year I have been getting deeply into this, a relatively new area for me, with a graduate student working on it). For an illustration see the pictures I have commenced uploading in my facebook Paul Hoole for my current (Semester 2, 2014) lectures to first year and second year students. Moreover research helps the students to take the lessons beyond the class room and relate it to challenging, contemporary and sometimes critical problems in the world and to do problem solving using what they have learnt in the classes. Research and Innovation use of class room lessons sharpens and focuses and creates interest and enthusiasm for the subject.
In formulating research and in training students to write research papers, it is important to teach them to focus on the question of “HOW” rather than “WHY”. (This is something I picked up from my niece who found this helpful guide from her former Thesis Advisor at the University of Pennsylvania, USA.) Consider the following research issues, and see how posing of the problem question in “:HOW” terms makes it loads easier to address, write and talk on it rather than poising it as a “WHY question.
Problem 1.
Why is it that a country so rich with natural resources and wealthy people, still have 40% of the population living under poverty line?
How is it that a country so rich with natural resources and wealthy people, still have 40% of the population living under poverty line?
Problem 2
Why is it that an airplane flying at high altitude (e.g. 10000 m, or 10 km) become a victim to a heat seeking missile launched from the earth?
How is it that an airplane flying at a high altitude of about 10 km be shot down by a heat seeking missile launched from ground?
Problem 3
Why is it that mobile communication system signal reception begin to significantly deteriorate when its speed increases?
How is it that mobile communication system signal reception begins to significantly deteriorate when its speed increases?
Problem 4
Why is it that children affected by autism show significant changes in EEG signals in the Beta (15 to 35 Hz) Band?
How is it that children affected by autism show significant changes in EEG signals in the Beta (15 to 35 Hz) Band?
Problem 5
Why is that a University where there are students with good, world class brains and a country whose economy is superior to many other countries still produce inferior graduates after 4 years in the University and/or the University still be low down in world University ranking?
How is that a University where there are students with good, world class brains and a country whose economy is superior to many other countries still produce inferior graduates after 4 years in the University and/or the University still be low down in world University ranking?
Prof Hoole, July 2014
______________________________________________________________________________
June 2013-May 2014 Update: Publications (published, in print, under review) by Dr Paul Hoole,
A.     Communication Engineering
1.       Shore to ship Steerable Electromagnetic Beam System based Ship Communication and Navigation, ACES Journal (ISI-cited), 2013 (USA)

2.      Strengthening the Desired Signal and Nulling the Main Interference for a Light Weight Wireless Mobile Station, ISI-cited Journal paper under review, 2014 (USA)
 B.     Power Engineering
1.       A New Electric Dipole Model for Lightning-Aircraft Electrodynamics, COMPEL: The International Journal for Computation and Mathematics in Electrical and Electronic Engineering (COMPEL, ISI-cited), 2014.(UK)

2.       Aircraft Modelling: from Electrostatics to Circuits, PIERS Journal, 2013 (USA)
3.       Renewable Energy Resource Mapping in Morobe Province, Papua New Guinea: solar and wind power, Grand Renewable Energy Conference, 2014, (Japan). 2 page Abstract accepted. Full Journal paper under preparation.

4.       Papua New Guinea National Energy Roll Out Plan (NEROP) and Power Quality of the Distribution System, Grand Renewable Energy Conference, 2014. (Japan.). 2 page Abstract accepted. Full Journal paper under preparation.

C.     Computer Engineering
5.       Parallelization on Graphical Processing Units (GPU) Realizing High Speed Up without Memory Limits, Abstract, Int Conf on Pure and Applied Mathematics, University of Technology, 2013 (PNG)
6.       A Software Testbed for Electrodynamics ISI-cited Journal paper under review, 2014 (Japan)

D.     Engineering Education
7.       Flip-Teaching Engineering Optimization, Electromagnetic Product Design, and Nondestructive Evaluation in a Semester’s Course, Journal. of Computer Applications in Engineering, John Wiley, accepted and  in print, 2014 (USA).
 E.     Book
8.       Engineering Electromagnetics Handbook, WIT Press, 2013 (UK).